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Member News and Information

The mission of the National Association of Crime Victim Compensation Boards is to provide leadership, professional development, and collaborative opportunities to our members to strengthen their capacity to improve services to crime victims and survivors.  We share a vision of working together so that every victim compensation program is fully funded, optimally staffed, and functioning effectively to help victims cope with the costs of crime.

Our Members-Only section is open to managers, staff and Board members of government crime victim compensation programs.  Contact us if you need assistance logging in.

Regional Conferences for compensation programs are being held this Spring.  
We look forward to our membership's participation in these valuable opportunities for training and networking.  Detailed information on each conference has been sent to every program.

Fifty Years of Crime Victim Compensation in America

California's Victim Compensation Program, established in 1965, was the first organized victim service program of any type in the United States, preceding domestic violence programs and other types of victim assistance agencies. Director Julie Nauman honors that anniversary in a message, noting that the program has paid out $2.3 billion in benefits to victims, and emphasizing the need to engage with communities to "spread the conversation about victim rights and work to end violence."

National Training Conference, August 25-27, 2015, Washington, DC
Open to compensation programs and VOCA assistance state administering agencies.



Return to FAQs

Application Procedures


1. How does a victim apply?

Applications can be obtained from the crime victim compensation program. Most programs now have web sites from which application forms can be downloaded. Check the Program Directory or State Links on this Web site for links to each state's program. Applications are also available from police, prosecutors, or victim service agencies. Many states also have brochures describing their programs. Victims can seek help from victim service programs in completing the application.

The application should be submitted as soon as possible. The compensation program will review the application to determine eligiblity and to decide what costs can be paid, and will notify the applicant of the program's decision.

2. Where does a victim apply?

               Victims generally should apply in the state where the crime occurred.  A few states may offer eligibility to their residents for crimes commited in other U.S. jurisdictions, but primary coverage staill comes from the state where the crime occurred.  About half the states offer help to their residents who are victims of crimes committed in foreign lands.  Foreign coverage is a matter of state law, and the individual state should be contacted regarding eligibility.

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